Monday, September 04, 2006

Wein msafer... Rja3

I am writing this post while listening to Julia Boutros' song, Wain Msafer?



(Real Player need to be installed)


I would like to dedicate this song to all the Lebanese who are living abroad and for all the Lebanese who are thinking of leaving Lebanon, remember your home, remember the day3a, remember where you first experienced your puppy love, remember the first time you got punished at school, remember the first time you got yelled at by your parents because you ate dessert before lunch, remember the first time you played street football, and everytime a car came by, you moved away until it passed and then resumed playing...

Time to give back,
try to,
stay here,
try to,
come back,
try to...

And don't leave.

"Mish ma32ouli innak boukra mish ra7 temrou2 7adel bayt..."

Lebanon, see you on Wednesday.

I would like to also link to my friend Clo's post:
يا طير فيروز... اسمع شو بدّي قلّك

18 comments:

  1. walla ya burned, reading your post with Julia's marvelous song... eh dapraset!

    I am living abroad, and was actually on vacation in Lebanon when the war started. And you know what, ironically, I am more attached to Lebanon more than ever. I will surely come back home when i finish my studies (i never thought otherwise), and you can remind me of that if i don't.

    You see, the lebanese who go abroad, they do it because they are seeking stability, we all know that. But within my circles, all of the lebanese i got to know around here feel they have a mission. They are here to spread a message, and be a source of light wherever they reach out (of course not counting some stupid as*h*les). Then again, don't forget that if we haven't spread like fungus around the planet, Lebanon wouldn't have made it through his ordeals.

    And finally, my personal point of view is a rather "planetary" one. I no longer beleive in a specified identity to which we owe everything. I am here on this planet, to do a mission, and not to Lebanon only, but to all humanity. I was a human before i was Lebanese. I was a human before I beleived or didn't beleive in god. and i will die as a human, not as a lebanese. You see, we don't own a country nor a land. Not the earth, nor the sky or the planets... so let our mission be universal, as much as we can... and this mission is to be derived from the principles we learned in our beloved Lebanon. its a win-win situation.

    "and the memory remains"

    Jedi@

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  2. To Jedi,

    Well yes, I don't deny the Lebanese have really succeeded abroad, and many of them have given a good image of Lebanon, and I understand we are humans before beeing Lebanese, but we are still Lebanese. It depends on the person I guess, I didn't tell ALL Lebanese to come back, some don't care for Lebanon, some feel more "international", and they care to just have a stable life, and a country that offers a lot of opportunities career wise, etc...
    I know if I live in the US, I will be much richer and probably a millionaire pretty soon... But I love Lebanon, and Lebanon has so many richness in its culture and traditions, we were raised on things that don't exist in the west.. and I like them... if I ever decide to live in the US (force majeur ya3ne), I would want to be surrounded by my family because there is this sparkle this lebanese tradition...
    I didn't mean to depress anyone, personally when I hear this song, I get goosebumps w btekhla2 fiye heik shou3our ma byefassar!

    To each his own mission anyway, but to those who want to come back, I really hope they do, and I hope those who have companies to come as well, this way they provide more job opportunities.
    But ya jedi.. I don't look at loving my country as patriotism or fear of other countries or selfishness, I feel I can do so much for my country (along with my fellow genius friends such as yourself), we can help educate, we can help decrease prejudice, increase art, increase music, increase opportunities, create research... Hayda 7elmeh...

    To Jooj,

    Thanks, I actually live in Lebanon, and I came to the US on vacation, before my return date, the war started and the airport closed, and now I am finally going back. I could've stayed, but for me life is about being with family and not just career.

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  3. So if you were in the US living in a Lebanese neighborhood where there is mana2ich, w falefil, knefe (something i really miss), taboule etc... where you go out and see your neighbor with her 10 kids all screaming and going crazy. where you wake up each day feeling you wanna kick the as* of that school bus driver who woke you up at 5:30 AM... if all of this is available to you, would you feel you are in Lebanon?

    what is this thing that attaches us to Lebanon? Is it only the traditions? is it the people? or is it simply because we were raised over there? so if you were raised in the US or guatemala, you would feel the same attachement to the US or guatemala. It will take a real person to say: "hey, i was born in Burundi but i have decided that i love Lebanon because it is the country of the cedars and the alphabet..."

    This makes no sense to me. Of course I love Lebanon for its traditions and the beautiful values we have learned over there... But by the same token, any citizen of the planet will feel the same about their traditions and think that ours are obsolete... It is exactely the same when u watch those religious debates about who owns god, whereas nobody knows s*it about him!

    Then, what makes sense to me, is to base my attachement to Lebanon on a more profound basis; one that is not based on feelings, memoires, or the first time i made love. This search for a more profound and reasonable attachement has eventually led me to realize that we are humans and that, again, no land is ours. we will all eventually die, and sometimes, the memory does not remain!

    So what? does that make me less Lebanese than you are? You know more than that... I am Lebanese and will forever be Lebanese. I will never erase my identity and I refuse to raise a family outside Lebanon. But all of this with an internal feeling that I am a human, and that wherever you throw me, i should be able to adapt and manage.

    Since i don't own the land, i tame it!


    Jedi@

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  4. This is not what I said. I didnt say I am more Lebanese than you.

    Inno you know me ya3ne, you know ma bzeyid 3ala 7adan w i said kil wa7ad 7or. W yes if I was raised in guatemala i would have loved guatemala, you didn't say anything I don't know or ackowledge!

    But I love Lebanon, and I like many other places in the world.

    3a kil 7al,inta 7eret w deret w 7kit several points w na2adet 7alak :)

    Which makes you a perfect Lebanese! :D

    Yalla rou7 dross :P

    One day you will understand what I meant.. till then

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  5. On the contrary, your blog is helping me understand my thoughts.

    What I am trying to fight here is that feeling of "stupid nationalism" they inject in us in Lebanon and the arab world: ("we are superior, cos we have a history" stuff). The world has changed. I am not fighting against you missing Lebanon or against the idea saying "oh you lebanese, don't leave your land etc.. etc.."

    I am fighting to have a profound "understanding" of missing Lebanon and the meaning of nationalism. And maybe one day i will understand what you mean, but remember, you've been here 2, 3... 4 months? Of course you will miss Lebanon. But you have not settled down here for 3 or 4 years. Once you do that, you will learn the true meaning of missing, and especially if you live alone. I respect your experience, and i know you respect mine... still, neither me, nor you have seen it all.

    Just answer this question: Why are you afraid that people are leaving Lebanon?

    oh, by the way, i have more time to annoy you on this blog now that i have finished my qualifiers ;)

    Jedi@

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  6. '... everytime a car came by, you moved away until it passed and then resumed playing' ... you just drew the first smile on my face today :)

    I never missed Lebanon as much I did after this war despite visiting twice this year and shortly before the war. I don't know but there is something in this war that got us all closer to the country and to each other ...

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  7. WoW , what a touching song by Julia. her, Majida and Fairuz have some incrdedible patriotic songs , and melhem barakat has this one song where he starts screaming towards the end,, wow..

    Always nice to see Lebs living abroad (like me) who cant forget, and just aching to go back, im here in montreal, the city provides everything and im sure if i stay here long enough, my attachments to Lebanon will decline. My cousins have been here for many years and call it home now. Thats the problem with immigration, people who leave usually stay abroad thru out their lives, maybe returning to retire.

    And this "brain drain" issue, all our talented and young leave the country. Something has to be done, it all starts and ends with the government. What can i say, i wish things were different.

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  8. Anonymous said...

    ...

    And this "brain drain" issue, all our talented and young leave the country. Something has to be done, it all starts and ends with the government. What can i say, i wish things were different.


    ---------------------

    Yep, you're so right, we can't tell everyone to come, because after all people want to live a good life, and at this point Lebanon doesn't offer it.. it offers a fun vacation i guess...
    Ajedna yalli ba3dna honeh :P

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  9. Hello, I am from GReece and I found this song "Wein Msafer" terrific, do you know from where I can download it? Thank you all and love to the libanese people...

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  10. Hi Luca, well you can download it from our blog, here is the link:
    http://www.independence05.com/blog/videos/Julia_wainmsafer.ram

    My gramma is greek :D Glad you liked the song, it has amazing lyrics

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  11. Thank you very much, I downloaded it and it is really great... I'd like to learn more about the lyrics. What does it say? I would be glad if you could translated for me. Your gramma is greek, eh? You see that our countries have a lot in common, this kind of music is so familiar to me, and that voice... it is something else.
    Thanks a lot again

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  12. Ahhhhh while I was translating the song... I just felt all those feelings. It is one of the best songs I've heard in my life.

    Okay, I am not that good in translation, I kind of translate word for word :P But am sure you will get the full meaning.

    Enjoy:

    Wain Msafer - Julia Boutros

    Imagine that, it will be the last time you call upon me and I will answer you
    The last time you will see my face, flowering in your eyes
    Where are you leaving (travelling), don't leave (travel), this is the last time I will tell you this
    Where are you leaving (travelling), don't leave (travel), this is the last time I will tell you this

    Imagine that tonight, will be the last night you spend here
    And the flower that you coloured, will be the last time it will be colorful
    You confused person, who told you that the universe is not here
    (verse x 2)

    It is impossible that tomorrow you will not pass by the house
    And tonight will be the last time you will ask me if I have loved
    And impossible that what was ours will all become a wish
    (verse x 2)

    Imagine that, it will be the last time you call upon me and I will answer you
    The last time you will see my face, flowering in your eyes
    Where are you leaving (travelling), don't leave (travel), this is the last time I will tell you this
    Where are you leaving (travelling), don't leave (travel), this is the last time I will tell you this

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  13. Thanks a lot!!!

    My God, this is really fantastic. I couldn't have imagined anything else, the music is indeed so expressive and the lyrics are just perfect!!!
    I was listening to the song while I was reading the lyrics. It is one of the most beautiful songs ever written, I agree to that with you, Liliane.

    And I want to thank you once more very very much for taking the time and the trouble to translate it to me.

    My best regards to you and the rest of the people participating this blog.

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  14. Well you're more than welcome, when you said you liked the song (its music), I was pretty sure you'll even like it more when you understand the lyrics.

    Glad you enjoyed.

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  15. HI... I HOPE YOU ARE ALL DOING WELL...

    IT IS A RAINY DAY IN ATHENS... I LOVE LISTENING TO THE SONG OF JULIA BOUTROS IN DAYS LIKE THIS... CAN YOU PROPOSE ME ANY SONGS (IN ARABIC) OF THE SAME KIND... LIKE BLUES...

    REGARDS TO ALL

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  16. Hi Luca! I would recommend actually her albums, my favorite is "Shi Gharib". I will search to see if I can find it online.

    Will let you know.

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  17. Thank you so very much!!!
    I'ii try to find it
    Have a nice evening

    Luca

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